Posts Tagged ‘webgl’

  • Anaemia demo by LiteWerx (WebGL)

    The Anaemia demo by Litewerx won 1st place in the TRSAC 2011 Demoparty that just finished. It’s a WebGL / JS demo using the Three JS library and consists of some lovely well-synced scenes. Although a little un-eventful in parts, the music helps keep things bubbling along and it’s an enjoyable ride that ran smooth as butter on my PC in full screen (i.e. maximised browser).

    Large to download (27MB) which takes its fair while pre-loading. And of course you need a browser capable of running WebGL. Chrome is best and works with the music. Other browsers may vary. But this is demoscene after all and not representative of using WebGL in a “typical web site” as some may mistakenly believe.

    Personally I just appreciate great demos no matter what they’re written in.

    Run the demo here (27MB, WebGL), vote for it on Pouet, or if you really must you can watch it on YouTube.

  • The reality of developing web games with Flash, HTML5 and Unity

    Update: Lots of new links added at the bottom and feedback from comments inserted into the article body.

    Today was a black day for Flash developers world-wide. Adobe announced it will drop Flash support for mobile browsers. This came the day after announcing mass redundancies across the company. On the face of it that doesn’t seem like a significant problem. But it has got the whole “Flash hate wagon” on the roll again, so I felt it was time to finally commit my thoughts to this blog.

    First of all: I am only concerned about game development for the web. This entire article focuses on this specific topic and this topic alone. This is not a “Flash vs. HTML5″ article. It’s not an article about building native apps for mobile. It’s entirely and utterly about the reality of making web games today.

    I compare Flash, HTML5 and Unity, as they are the only viable web gaming platforms today. For each of them I cover 10 topics:

    1. Workflow – How easy is it to actually create a game?
    2. Platform Stability – Will things change between the time you start and finish your game?
    3. Backward Support – Will your game still run 10 years down the line?
    4. Mobile – Will your game run at all?!
    5. Distribution – There’s no point making something no-one will play
    6. Security – Code and IP protection
    7. Monetization – All about making games to make money
    8. Facebook – The social gaming angle
    9. How many people will play your game?
    10. 3D Support – Stage3D vs. WebGL vs. Unity

    These are all areas that I feel game developers ought to be aware of when evaluating new platforms. I conclude this with my advice to Flash game developers both new and seasoned.

    It’s a long read but it was vital I covered as much as I could, using facts and stats rather than hyperbole, so you can make the best informed decision possible.

    Read More