Posts Tagged ‘html5’

  • Insert Coin to Continue: The HTML5 Game Sponsorship Market

    I had the pleasure of giving a presentation at the onGameStart 2012 conference in Warsaw, Poland. The title of my talk was “Insert Coin to Continue”. A gentle nod to the fact that lots of game developers do actually need paying in order to carry on creating great games! I wanted to share my experiences and results of working in the HTML5 game sponsorship market. The Flash world is well served by sites like FGL and blog posts detailing income and strategies. But very little exists for HTML5 games, hence the choice of topic for my talk. This article will cover most of my presentation for those who weren’t able to attend.

     Client games vs. Indie games

    As a company we develop HTML5 games for both clients and ourselves. The reason is both financial and practical. Client work simply pays better right now. And the more of it you do, the more doors it can open to other bigger and more interesting projects. In my experience this is no different to any other platform. But there are obvious benefits of making your own games:

    • It’s your own IP! There is value in establishing a brand and common IP even in the relatively small scale sponsorship world.
    • You can make anything. This is important – no matter how awesome your clients are you are always working within set brand guidelines. They’ll never really allow you to do truly anything you want. But when you build for yourself this restriction is removed. You have to be careful of course, as great as Dinosaur Chicken Rock III might sound to you, if you want to get sponsors it needs to appeal to the wider market too.
    • There is the very real chance of long term income. I’ll cover this later in the article, but ad revenue and ‘game rental’ can build up substantially over time, where as most client work is a one-off payment.

    The benefits are obvious. As well as getting to flex your design muscles in your own way there are significant long term benefits as well. Lots of companies started out by mixing client and indie work only to find that the income from their indie endeavors was enough to leave the client side behind (Nitrome are a good example of this). So let’s explore how you turn this passion into income.

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  • Our new game Color Crush is out

    Color Crush is our new mini puzzle game. After the rush of client games we’ve been blogging about recently we felt it was time to show something that we made just for ourselves :) It will be one of the launch line-up games on the new AOL Games.com mobile portal, but essentially was just something put together because I’ve always loved this style of game.

    It’s actually a port of a Flash game I made many years ago and I literally ported the AS3 classes over to JavaScript. The resulting JS code is a lot smaller because I ditched a mass of getters and setters (no point in JS as you can break anything, from anywhere at a whim!) but essentially it’s the exact same code, line for line. Anyway have a play and see if you can get a Bronze, Silver or Gold rating :) It’ll work on desktop browsers and mobile phones and tablets of course.

    http://gametest.mobi/colorcrush/

    Needless to say if you’d like to license this game for your portal then drop us a line.

  • Our HTML5 game for McCoy’s Crisps is out

    We’re very pleased to announce that today saw the start of the McCoy’s “Darts Pro’s at your pub” campaign. McCoy’s are a very popular brand of crisp (potato chip) in the UK. This on-pack campaign allows players to challenge a virtual darts professional to a single or triple throw contest. Winners get entered into the draw to win Xbox 360s and other prizes.

    The web side of the campaign was run by local agency Activation Digital who contracted us to build the game. Over 50 million packets of crisps have been printed with the QR code and URL on them, so if you fancy a bag of cheese and onion be sure to look out for it :)

    Read more about our build process and play the game here.

  • Our new 8-bit inspired HTML5 game: Droplets

    The problem with working so hard on a framework and client projects, is that you have precious little time left for your own games. I felt the need to correct this. So I spent a day converting one of our Flash games to HTML5:

    Droplets is a simple little game based on the range of vinyl toys created by Jam Factory. Just get the 5 droplets home, collect as many hearts as you can on the way, and avoid contact with pretty much everything else! The mobile version differs from the Flash one in that you slide left/right and have a lot of bounce – if you aren’t too careful you can end up ricocheting around the place like a pinball. Get home to the factory at the end to complete the level.

    Simple, but still quite fun :) And I’m very happy with the way it resizes intelligently on most devices. I’ve tested it on a variety of phones and tablets, from an iPhone 3 up to a Nexus 7, and it ran ok on most of them. Some (like the Samsung Galaxy S3) don’t cope with the canvas scaling too well and thus the frame rate suffers, but on the whole it’s about all that the ImpactJS engine can handle.

    Point your mobile browser at http://gametest.mobi/droplets/ to play. And if by some fluke you’re a portal looking to license it, drop me a line.

  • The one in which we do a podcast interview, VJ at Blip Fest and tech edit an HTML5 book

    It’s been a busy few weeks for both Ilija and I. He has been off in Melbourne VJing at the Blip Festival. It was the biggest chip music event to hit Australia and had a formidable line-up including Bit Shifter, Nullsleep and my personal favourites Trash80. There are various videos and pictures of the show, all of them varying from “ok” to “terrible” in quality at the moment, but here you can see Saitone play while Ilija mixes the visuals in the background:

    Now he’s finished playing with video mixers for a while he may even post the “Making of” the pixeltastic new RGCD logo :)

    A book you say?

    Over on my side of the planet I’ve been kept busy mostly buried deep in HTML5 land. I started out the year by doing a technical edit of Jesse Freeman’s new book Introducing HTML5 Game Development published by O’Reilly. It’s one of O’Reilly’s new short-format books, meaning it weighs in at just over 100 pages rather than the usual epic tomes they publish. Jesse focussed the book specifically on coding with the ImpactJS framework and walks you through the process, start to finish, including wrapping it up for mobile. If you’re new to ImpactJS and want a good cheap overview of using it, then for $14 you can’t really go wrong (and members of his NY User Group can get 50% off even that low price!)

    … and a podcast!

    Matt and Geoff over at Lost Decade Games record a regular podcast called the Lostcast. Being html5 indie game devs they focus their podcast on and around this subject. Recent topics have included the Zynga cloning debacle and HTML5 the Bad Parts. Episode 9 was released today and features a nearly hour long interview with me about the subjects of html5, flash and game development in general. I had great fun chatting with the guys and thank them for inviting me to interview. To anyone who listens I apologise for rambling on for too long in parts, but hope you take away something interesting from the discussions anyway!

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